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Jerikaye

The dance is a most elegant and mesmerizing form of expression for this gypsy-at-heart. Jerikaye’s repertoire of dance styles tells stories of places near and far, ancient and modern. Lifelong training in contemporary western dance styles only enriches her understanding and appreciation of the richly meaningful and mysterious dance styles of the Orient.  

Her stylistic span can be described as both “modern” and “tribal.”  Her chief specialty is American Tribal Style® Belly Dance – a formalized modern fusion of dance styles from all along the Great Gypsy Trail including classical Indian dance, Spanish flamenco dance, North African tribal dance, and Middle Eastern belly dance which has a group-oriented improvisational structure.

Known as the Fire Maiden, Jerikaye is one of the pioneers of fire dancing on the Gulf Coast, planting fire communities in the various cities she's lived and frequented, ever drawn to the hypnotizing flame in an effort to truly exude grace under fire.  She specializes in fire poi – a form of object manipulation which originated with the Maori people of New Zealand, migrated to the Pacific islands, and then to the West Coast of the United States in the twentieth century. She specializes in fusing this form with modern tribal dance, also utilizing other fire and flow props in a variety of creative ways. She is a performing artist, teacher, creative director, and event coordinator. www.internationaldanceus.com/jerikaye

Workshops

Friday 12:00-2:00 pm - Swordwork for ATS (R) and Beyond

"Never give a sword to a man who can't dance." - Confucius. Whether you are interested in beginning or perfecting your sword technique, this class is for you. No matter what style of bellydance you practice, there is a rich foundation of swordwork crystallized in the American Tribal Style (R) tradition that any style of dancer can draw upon. Ideal for groups, improvisation, or highly-refined solos, there is something for everyone. After a warm-up specifically designed for gaining the strength and flexibility necessary to handle a sword properly, we will begin with a detailed examination of the basic positions and mechanics of sword handling, carriage, and weilding. Every detail, such as the angle of the blade, the gaze of the eyes, the upper body carriage, and more, will be illuminated as we discover the most strikingly beautiful and powerful ways to handle a sword. Covering everything from handling to balancing, we will see how this refined swordwork is seamlessly layered with classic bellydance movements. Drawn from several sister traditions within ATS (R), this cannon of swordwork is technically refined yet flexible, often offering several different swordwork variations for any given momma move, without breaking technique. We will gain a knowledge of not only the basic movement mechanics, but also the transitions and embellishments that make ATS (R) swordwork so magically seamless and beautifully intimidating. Requirements: bring a sword! For ATS (R) dancers, the recommended type of sword is a hawksbill scimitar, but any sword will work. I will have only a few extra swords so please bring one. Contact Jerikaye with any questions at firemaidens@gmail.com.

Saturday 2:30-4:30 pm - Tambourines for American Tribal Style (R) Belly Dance and Beyond

The tambourine...it's not just a prop, it's a percussion instrument...(and that's why we love it so much!) Cultures from all over the world utilize tambourine or similar instruments in their song and dance. At once a drum and zills, what we call the tambourine is one of the most ancient percussion instruments used by dancers. Over the years, Jerikaye has adapted basic tambourine-playing techniques to fit the American Tribal Style (R) belly dance "fast" or rhythmical format. This tambourine format can easily be generalized to other styles of belly dance or dance. Come learn to enjoy playing this classic instrument in a new and fun way! Your hips can't have all the fun; let's teach your hand how to shimmy too! Any tambourine with a drumhead and zills (i.e., "jingles" or "cymbals") will work. Get yourself a tambourine and come play!